Why does "drink vinegar" mean "jealous" in Chinese?

Why does "drink vinegar" mean "jealous" in Chinese?

Vinegar is a common addition to food in China. When eating dumplings, we often have vinegar. However, if we say that a person "chīcù", it doesn't mean "drinking vinegar". It means someone is jealous of another person. A common example is when a woman is jealous because her favourite man is busy with others. Why do we say it like that? This saying is related to a story in Chinese history.

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Five Books for Learning Chinese (and Everything)

Five Books for Learning Chinese (and Everything)

People are always looking for a new way to memorize vocabulary, understand grammar, to learn a language. Everyone has their own experience and methods and sharing how you learn can help others. Personally, I enjoy learning from books. I hope this short list of books about how we learn will benefit not only your Chinese studies but everything.

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Descendents of the Dragon ... and Other Awesome Ways to say "Chinese People"

Descendents of the Dragon ... and Other Awesome Ways to say "Chinese People"

When you begin learning Chinese, you learn that the word for Chinese people in Chinese is 中国人 (zhōng guó rén). However 中国人 is more of a nationality, ie. Chinese citizens. What about American Chinese? Canadian Chinese? Singaporean Chinese? Vietnamese Chinese? Are they still 中国人? 

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GoEast Chinese Lessons: How to order a drink in Chinese?

GoEast Chinese Lessons: How to order a drink in Chinese?

It’s never too hard to get a drink in big cities in China such as Shanghai or Beijing for a new comer - bartenders usually understand the English names pretty well and the drink lists are mostly in both languages. However, ordering a drink in Chinese never fails to impress your friends or a romantic interest. 

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How To Express Purpose in Chinese

How To Express Purpose in Chinese

Just a few days ago, I had a class with a student. During the class, I noticed he said 为了(wèile) several times, but not necessarily in the right way. “为了” is a proposition, which means “in order to”, “for the purpose of”, “for the sake of”. It indicates some purpose.  This blog post is about how to use “为了” properly. 

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Chinese Greetings For Chinese New Year

Chinese Greetings For Chinese New Year

It smells like spring in Shanghai now, and the whole nation is ready to celebrate. Yes, 春节(chūnjié,Chinese New Year’s Day) falls on the 8th of February this year, but it starts with the 团圆饭 (tuányuán fàn) on the 7th and ends with the 元宵节 (Yuánxiāo jié, Lantern Festival) on the 22nd. 2016 will be 猴年(Hóu nián, the Year of Monkey)!

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